Hope for Heart Failure

The answer is yes, there is hope for you or your relative heart failure patients, regardless of how many heart attacks they have survived and even if the attacks have  occurred over several years.  The medical profession has always functioned under the available information that a heart damaged from a heart attack could never been repaired.  Once the heart develops scar tissue from the event and later becomes enlarged, there was nothing more to be done other than medications and possibly having implanted devices  such as pacemakers and defibrillators to help prolong the patient’s  life. Dr. Doris Taylor while on faculty at Duke University proved that theory to be false.

There are currently about 6M congenital heart failure cases in the US and an estimated 22 M worldwide. The life expectancy is 5.5 to 7.5 years from diagnosis.  So where is the hope, where is the answer to rejuvenating these damaged hearts and is it even possible to make these claims of restoration?  http://www.abigon.com/miraclestemcellheartrep.html and now you can read about actual  successful cases.

Again, the answer is yes, thousands have over the past 10 years experienced having stem cells extracted from their own leg muscle or from the bone marrow of a donor, multiplied by the millions in the laboratory and then injected by catheter into the damaged areas of heart muscle.  The procedure takes about 45 minutes to an hour and is a minimally invasive procedure with the patient in a twilight sleep and released from the facility the next day. Too good to be true?  Twelve case histories of patients who had as many s 5 heart attacks over time who are today 10 years post treatment functioning as normal individuals completely free of their previous heart failure condition.  Christian Wilde’s book, Miracle Stem Cell Heart Repair, carries their actual before and after stories to full recovery.  The Directors of cardiovascular stem cell therapy at 7 major universities who conduct the ongoing FDA trials for these “no option” heart failure patients explain the science behind the procedures.

Did you like this? Share it: